We Just Got a Glimpse of Kate Middleton’s Most-used Emojis

Kate Middleton waving

Kate Middleton may be a future Queen, but that doesn’t mean she’s any fancier than the rest of us. At least when it comes to her choice of emojis. 

In late November, the Kensington Royal Instagram account shared a video of the Duchess of Cambridge answering questions about “the Early Years” project and general questions around child-rearing, which Kate defined as pregnancy through age 5. For a split second, Kate flashes her phone toward the camera to show off just how many questions they received, and in doing so, inadvertently shared all her own favorite emojis. 

According to eagle-eyed fans, Kate’s most recently used emojis include two girls holding hands, a pineapple, sliced-up cucumber, a gust of wind, a purple alien monster, a woman bowing emoji, the vomiting face, and the swearing face. 

Of course, we have no way of knowing the context to any of those emojis, and this also assumes Kate uses her own actual phone when promoting the Kensington Royal Instagram account, but man oh man do we have some theories on why she uses these emojis so often. (Theories we won’t share here out of fear that the royal family will come for us.) 

Though the focus of this Instagram post has been Kate’s love of emojis, the video does go on to share important insights around parenting and the Duchess’ passion for The Early Years, her first solo initiative, which launched in 2018.

According to Vanity Fair, Kate launched the program in collaboration with a group of child development experts in an attempt to address the mental and emotional wellness of children and the future of early childhood education.

“This isn't just about happy, healthy children,”  the Duchess shared in the video. “This is about the society I hope we could and can become.”

 Stacey Leasca is a journalist, photographer, and media professor. She’s convinced the “prayer hands” emoji is actually two people high-fiving. Send tips and follow her on Instagram now. 

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